The Week’s Most Popular Posts: June 1 – 5, 2015

This post originally appeared on Panels, which is now Book Riot Comics

Let’s take a look back at the week that was, here on Panels:

Nimona by Noelle Stevenson (Andi Miller)

Subversive good fun. Nimona is about Ballister Blackheart, a not-so-villainous villain…a victim of fate, if you will. One day, a teen girl named Nimona blows into his life bound and determined to be his sidekick. The girl is a wicked shapeshifter with a thirst for blood and a dark past. Another victim of circumstance? I’m not telling because you must read this wild romp. It challenges gender norms, it pushes the conventions of sci-fi and fantasy, and it’s probably the best comics thing I’ve read this year.

from The Best Comics We Read in May 2015 by Becca Sexton

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Increasingly, I’m finding that “just jump in” is the way to go with comics, and I was delightfully reminded of that when I had a look at Groot #1 by Jeff Loveness and Brian Kesinger. In this book, the adorable Groot and his best pal Rocket are on an intergalactic road trip, and they get into all kinds of shenanigans. You don’t need to know anything else. You don’t need any background. The entire story is right there.

from What the Flark? With Groot, Less Is More by Kristina Pino

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Little by little over the last month, DC Comics has released sneak peek 8-page previews for their ongoing and brand-new books in the “DC You.” Released totally free to the public through Comixology and DC’s own site, the sneak peeks are essentially the future of the DCU, with less focus on continuity and more focus on creating stories for all different kinds of readers.

During the past few weeks, I took on the semi-Herculean task of reading all 44 of these previews. Yes, there were quite a few that dragged. Many just didn’t interest me. However, the large majority of the previews were strong. Better than strong, actually. I found 28 books that made me really optimistic about DC’s plans for the future. Below is my extremely biased list of 28 awesome looking books from DC based on their sneak peeks, ranging from “buy this now!” to “give it a chance for a few issues” to “not sure yet, but dang this has a ton of promise.” Browse the list, check out the previews links, and hopefully you’ll find a few of your new favorite comics.

from Breaking Down DC’s New Series by Katie Schenkel

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I won’t say Jews invented superheroes—Gilgamesh and Hercules came first—but we’ve played the superhero shtick a long time. That scrappy kid who took down down a villain ten times his size? The time two heroes fought all night until they reached a draw and realized they were both on the side of righteousness? They’re biblical stories of David and Goliath and Jacob wrestling the angel, and also comic book tropes.

What is a superhero but someone who keeps surviving, living through the night and waking up in the morning and taking up the fight and surviving another night? What don’t Jewish people know about superheroes?

from My Heroes Have Always Been Jewish by Monica Friedman

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It’s great to see a literary icon like Margaret Atwood ask questions about comics. Questions are great! Comics or, more specifically, the superhero genre in comics can be confusing especially when it involves decades of history in a shared universe a la Marvel, and DC. I’ve already written about the Spider women who are currently killing it with their own solo titles so why not break down these fangtastic women? So wait, do these bat women have fangs???? (No). Is Batwoman related to Batgirl? (Depends on the Bat-Girl, and the Batwoman). Is Batboy a thing? (No, but there are a TON of Robins). How many red headed bat women with psycho siblings are there? (at least more than one!).

So many bat women, so little time…oh, time is not an issue? Cool. Onward!

from Who Are the Bat Women? Part One by Ardo Omer

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Renew Your Vows #1 doesn’t make up for what was lost in One More Day. I realize I’m talking about their relationship like I was in it. That’s because as readers, we all were. And One More Day erased an important milestone in Peter’s history and our own reading history. That being said, this is a good start to give us a glimpse of what we missed out on. What Peter and Mary Jane missed out on. And I appreciate that.

from Amazing Spider-Man: Renew Your Vows #1 by Preeti Chhibber

A gift from us to you! Get free mismatched library socks with any purchase in the Book Riot Store while supplies last. Treat yourself (and your favorite elf). br_mismatched_rc
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