The Week’s Most Popular Posts: March 2-6, 2015

This post originally appeared on Panels, which is now Book Riot Comics

Let’s take a look back at the week that was here on Panels:

By now you’ve probably heard that Matt Fraction and Kelly Sue DeConnick, along with various co-creators, have inked a deal with Universal TV to adapt some of their comics properties for television. First on the slate is Sex Criminals, Fraction and artist Chip Zdarsky’s Eisner- and Harvey-Award-winning comic from Image, about a couple who can stop time when they orgasm, and use that power to rob banks (for a good cause!). We at Panels HQ are totally stoked, and would like to offer you some dreamcasting suggestions. You know, like we do.

from Dreamcasting Sex Criminals: Out of the Quiet and Into Your Living Room by Jessica Plummer

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Storm, Vol. 1 by Greg Pak, Victor Ibanez, and Matteo Buffagni

I really wish I hadn’t waited so long to start this amazing series. I like the characters in the X-Men, but the universe is way too daunting for me to really be interested in making any inroads into it. Storm is a great place to start; it’s funny, touching, and completely kickass, just like Storm herself. — Swapna

from The Best Comics We Read In February 2015 by Andi Miller

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What I’d like to see instead is more women writing (and drawing) comics. And more nonbinary people writing comics. And more non-white people, and more non-straight people, and more disabled people. As many voices from the margins as possible.

Because the more authentic voices we have out there telling their stories, and telling stories about people like them, the more tools we have for understanding people and narratives that are different from us. But it also gives every reader a chance to pick up a comic with someone on the cover who looks like them and think, “Wow. This writergets it.” And don’t we all deserve that feeling?

from The Power of Women Writing Women by Jessica Plummer

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Like most things in comics business, variant covers are a lot more complicated than they really need to be. Tiers is probably the best way to describe how variant covers work in today’s comics industry. In general practice, some comics will ship with multiple covers for their first printing that are more-or-less equally distributed. Sometimes a comic will ship with interconnected or interlocking variant covers – the image only makes sense if you link them together – to drive up initial sales of an issue, especially a first issue. Generally these books are sold for their cover price and are relatively easy to come by.

from Help A New Comic Reader Out: Variant Covers by Alli Colluccio

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So, if you enjoyed the hell out of Ready Player One like I did, I have some comics that you might enjoy. Instead of a bunch of readalikes, though, here are a few comics that highlight some key elements of the story.

from Comics Recommendation Engine: Ready Player One by Jessica Pryde

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Nimoy ended up standing up for that character, for that role. He ended his life proud of that ripple. He was proud of the people who looked to him, he invited anyone who wanted to do so to consider him an honorary grandparent. He accepted all who came to him, in the end, as part of his legacy. It’s a legacy of creation, or building, of standing firm and insisting on making the world a better place.

Leonard Nimoy, you were a good human being. You are already missed.

from A Tribute to Leonard Nimoy by Swapna Krishna

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