Critical Linking

Critical Linking: March 2, 2012

Our daily round-up of bookish links. Tastes great with coffee.

 

“While “Hunger Games” is being compared to “Twilight” by many people, because both are based on books series that are tremendously popular with teenagers, Lionsgate’s upcoming film has one key advantage: While the four “Twilight” films have generated their nearly $1.1 billion in domestic box office primarily from women, surveys show that men are interested in “The Hunger Games” as well.”

Katniss Everdeen…the first great female screen action heroine? Who else would it be?

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“These are terrific diversions, but their status next to the book is a little ambiguous. Isn’t using animation to advertise a book a little like using sculpture to promote poetry?”

Good point. I always forget that all those Bud Light ads are actually made out of beer. (Plug: have you checked out our new site dedicated to book trailers?)

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“A couple of years ago, I was asked to give a talk about “The American Novel Today.” It wasn’t my first choice of topic, frankly, partly because I read as few contemporary novels as possible”

Don’t make an effort to read contemporary novels? Well then sure I want to hear about how you think contemporary American novels suck.

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“My hope is for even longer batteries.”

This is the kind of digital-reading futurism I can get behind. (Though I think he means longer lasting batteries.)

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“Amazon’s and Sony’s efforts to conquer e-books were the inverse of one another: Sony enjoyed competence in its hardware but was a stranger to the ecosystem; Amazon was well positioned in the ecosystem but was less competent with its hardware. The e-book ecosystem–like so many of today’s innovative efforts–is ultimately a system of interdependencies. Success is not determined on the basis of a winning effort at any single point; it requires moving the entire cohort of partners in the same direction.”

This makes me think of Amazon as Colonel Jessop from A Few Good Men. We might not like how Amazon operates, but we live in a digital reading world largely of their creation. We want them on that wall, because no one else can do it.