CRITICAL LINKING: January 9, 2012

Our daily round-up of bookish links. Tastes great with coffee.

 

“Every writer is two people (at least). There’s the one that does the writing, and the one that has an egg for breakfast. I’m the other one.”

Twitter, where you can read what your favorite authors are eating. And other stuff.

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“I wanted you to play the part because Dean (as you know) is no dopey hotrodder but a real intelligent (in fact Jesuit) Irishman. You play Dean and I’ll play Sal (Warner Bros. mentioned I play Sal) and I’ll show you how Dean acts in real life.”

Two things: we need to bring hotrodder back. Second, the idea of Keroauc acting next to Brando is dizzying.

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“I am not sure that this helps us very much in predicting the future of the classics, but my guess is that in 2111 people will still be engaging with the classics, edgily and creatively, that they will still be lamenting their decline—and probably looking back to us as a Golden Age of classical studies.”

I bet if you had a time machine you could go back to Plato’s academy and hear someone grinch about how much it sucks that people don’t care as much about Homer as they used to.

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“Trust me when I tell you that few people are eager to read a story whose opening lines sound like a dissertation on giant bugs.”

Actually, a dissertation on giant bugs sounds pretty damn interesting.

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“Because we understand that “we cannot or will not change the work of art by our actions,” we are relieved of our desire to exert an influence over objects and people and hence are able to “disengage our [cognitive] systems for initiating actions.” That frees us to become absorbed in the imaginary world of the literary work. We read the author’s words with “poetic faith,” to borrow a phrase that the psychologically astute Coleridge used two centuries ago.”

This seems right to me.

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