Why We Should Still Read Shakespeare: Critical Linking, December 19, 2019

Critical Linking is a daily roundup of the most interesting bookish links from around the web, sponsored by Talion Publishing LLC, publishers of the thrilling Talion Series by J.K. Franko.


“But if we can turn Shakespeare’s plays into other kinds of entertainment that don’t require us to read footnotes or sit flummoxed in the audience while actors make archaic jokes, why should we read Shakespeare at all? He can be profoundly difficult to understand, an issue even his first audiences encountered, since he stuffed his speeches not only with hundreds of loan words, but hundreds of his own coinages as well.”

Why the Bard is still poppin’.


“‘…I was like, I feel compelled to tell everyone that I know about this thing that happened, and I would start saying to people just in dinner conversations, ‘Hey have you ever heard about Black Wall Street?’ and people would be like ‘No,’ and I would start talking and I would see their eyes kind of glaze over,” he continued. “Not because they were bored, but because I think it was too much to take in. I was like, I gotta find a way to Trojan Horse this story into something where people have to see it.'”

Ta-Nehisi Coates, everybody: dropping knowledge and blowing minds.


“Indie comics broke new ground in the 2010s in large part because they better represented their readers, with a focus on themes of diversity and inclusion, which in turn fostered more diversity and inclusion in the industry. Every graphic novel on this list has won an award, and every one influenced the comic book medium or culture in some way. However, this list only covers 12 of our favorites, and there is literally no way to include everything that influenced the decade into one list, so we invite you to comment with the titles you feel we missed.”

Weigh in on the comics that influenced you this decade!