50 Pulp Cover Treatments of Classic Works of Literature: Critical Linking, May 4, 2018

Critical Linking is sponsored by Everything that Follows by Meg Little Reilly.


Last month at CrimeReads, Rebecca Romney looked at a few classic detective novels that had, at one time or another, gotten makeovers as sexy pulps—because as we all know, the easiest way to sell something is to make it look salacious (whether it actually is or not). But it isn’t only great detective novels that have gotten the pulp treatment. Classic works of literary fiction have existed as pulps from the very beginning of pulp—the new paperback publishers of the 1940s and 50s printed them right along with classic crime and some genuinely lowbrow (and sometimes quite lurid) new novels, often commissioning the very same artists to design their covers. Below, I dug up a few of these pulpified classics (not including the Pulp! The Classics imprint)—many of which I found through the excellent resource Pulp Covers. Some are true pulp covers—with overtly sexy women and tantalizing movie-esque taglines—while others are just amusingly lowbrow mass market treatments of highbrow novels. Either way, they’re even better than you’d expect.

I love these and wouldn’t mind seeing pulp design really have a resurgence

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Hermiston’s schools have been enthusiastic competitors in the statewide Battle of the Books competition, but they won’t be at next year’s event.

The district’s five elementary school principals have chosen to withdraw from the statewide competition, stating that one of the books on the elementary school reading list is incompatible with the district’s curriculum.

The elementary school principals sent a letter to parents stating that the novel “George,” by Alex Gino, was not appropriate for their third- through fifth-grade students, based on their adopted human growth and development curriculum.

I’m sure the trans students there are feeling supported and cared about right now. Assholes and cowards, all of them

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Reading material, whether destination-related or just a way to while away the journey, is an essential packing list item. But cozy, well-curated independent bookstores are often trip-worthy in their own right. We asked 11 best-selling writers to tell us which shops are worth a detour for book-loving travelers.

 

This is a great list with a few places you’d guess and many that are fresh picks

 

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My Students

Sophomores are the best! They are so funny, and actually, pretty honest…some might say, brutally honest, but I prefer that to the contrary. Maturity is exploding. No longer are they freshman (the most challenging group), but emerging into adults. Quite honestly, it is an honor to watch them!

A HUGE component of their academic development relies on our ability to promote their emotional and mental wellness so that they feel encouraged to explore issues in America and become empowered to make a difference.

In the case of my students, students from the East Side of Chicago, a very diverse population, this can be a challenge. Let me explain. The upside of public education in this area is also the downside. Students enter our doors from all types of homes. Homes with loving supportive parents, homes from the contrary. Homes that are well kept, organized, and support teachers and learning, homes of the contrary. Homes where substance abuse is not present, and homes of the contrary. Homes with parents who are hard working and send their sons and daughters with school supplies, and the contrary.

All of this takes money. Money for qualified teachers, support personnel, books, technology, paper, pens, etc.

My Project

Money…needs persist, and all Americans are well aware. Well aware. However, all of this considered and all the rhetoric from our politicians has resulted in cuts to public education. Sad at best. Therefore teachers look to DonorsChoose, to you to help provide us the tools to inspire intelligent, reflective, voting citizens.

This novel, written in unique poetic verse, is a creative example of issues that are present in the lives of my students.

“Long Way Down” forces one to examine our own values and challenges us to overcome past hindrances to move forward in a productive manner. If you have not read it, I encourage you to do so. Thank you, Jason Reynolds!

$361 will fully fund this project. Let’s get it done