New South Wales Public Libraries to Promote Literary Mocktails

Australian culture has a bit of a drinking problem. Social events often involve beer and booze, going to the pub after work can become a regular occurrence, and there are several months in the year dedicated to encouraging people NOT to drink (FebFast, Dry July, OcSober). When a quarter of the year is dedicated to attempts to not drink, that might be a sign that there’s a problem.

The State Library of New South Wales in Australia is launching a campaign to promote mocktails as a fun alternative to alcoholic beverages as well as promote the State Library’s Drug Info Service. The Drug Info Service regularly holds campaigns to teach the public about drugs, such as what the actual size of a standard alcoholic drink is. It provides resources for schools, public libraries, publishes guides about drugs and alcohol, and is a source of information about drugs, alcohol, the law, and the services available to the public in relation to these issues.

This latest campaign consists of postcards with recipes for literary mocktails—mocktail recipes and names based on literary themes. The mocktails were voted on by the public and the postcards will be distributed across NSW public libraries.

These were the winning literary mocktails:

  • Grape Expectations (Great Expectations)
  • A Sidecar Named Desire (A Streetcar Named Desire)
  • Tequila Mockingbird (To Kill a Mockingbird)
  • The Turn of the Screwdriver (The Turn of the Screw)
  • Watermelon for Elephants (Water for Elephants)

The postcards feature the recipe for the mocktail and a message about safe alcohol consumption and tips for reducing alcohol intake. More information can be found here.

 

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Jen Sherman: Jen is an urban and cultural geographer. She recently submitted her PhD on public libraries as reading infrastructure and is finally finding time to read again for fun. She also recently moved from Sydney, Australia to sunny California and is realising the importance of the Baby-Sitters Club, Anastasia Krupnik and Ramona Quimby to her understanding of American culture. As a researcher, her interests are in libraries, book retailing, and the book industry (among others). As a reader, she’s a sucker for happily-ever-afters. Twitter: @jennnigan