Reading on the Train: A Story in GIFs

Having recently started my first-ever full-time job, my reading life has changed quite a bit. Unlike those lazy college days that were spent sprawled on the bed with a good book, I now have to consciously find reading time on weekdays. I have therefore made it a rule to read during my 30-minute morning commute to work on the local train. Here’s an accurate, gif-y summary of the girl on the train (haa).

You enter the train, and find that there are no vacant seats, so you can either hold on to something for support, or to your book. What’s it going to be?

There was never really a choice…

You pull out your book, plug in your earphones, and settle in.

People in the vicinity immediately crane their necks in an attempt to figure out the title of your book.

… Sometimes they’ll even try to strike up a conversation with you about it.

Go away, I’m reading.

You spot someone across the coach who’s a fellow reader, and make awkward eye-contact.

HOW GREAT ARE READERS!?

You then return to putting your book in your eyeballs.

Without warning, the train passes under a tunnel and your reading light is compromised.

… The light is restored and you realize that your reading bro is actually reading a book written from a privileged, elitist point of view.

The book is now giving you all the feels, but you gotta hold ’em back.

Before you know it, your stop arrives, and you need to decide between finishing those last few pages, or deboarding and going to work.

The next day, you board the train, ready for another bookish spell, but you realize you forgot your book at home.

A woman checked out a book called How to Win a Local Election. And she did. Listen to Annotated on Apple Podcasts or Google Play to hear her story.
Deepali Agarwal: Deepali Agarwal has a Master’s in literary linguistics, which means that every person she’s ever known has, at some point, asked her to ‘edit a thing’ for them-- ‘just see if it reads okay?’ She doesn’t mind, because she believes that the world can be fixed one oxford comma at a time. Deepali lives in Delhi, the capital of India, where cows are sacred, but authors and poets exist and write brilliant things. She works as an editor with OUP India’s School ELT division, where she moves apostrophes, looks up pictures of cats, and talks about children’s books for eight hours. The rest of her day is spent reading, thinking about Parks and Recreation, and wondering if there exist jobs for English majors that pay more than peanuts. Twitter: @DeepaliAgarwal_