This Harry Potter Clothing Line for Adults Is Magical AF: Critical Linking, July 16, 2017

Critical Linking is sponsored by Annotateda Book Riot Podcast presented by Hachette Book Group. 

____________________

The Harry Potter book series is long over, but true fans are always on the lookout for magic in our boring Muggle lives. For those of us who grew up with the books, they remind us both of our childhood and the idea that good can always overcome evil.

BRB, tossing out all of my wardrobe and filling it with Harry Potter clothes

____________________

6. WRITE A SUMMARY.

Your job shouldn’t end when you read the last word on the page. After you finish reading, write a few sentences to summarize what you read, and answer any questions you had before you started reading. Did you learn what you were hoping to learn? By spending a few minutes after reading to think, synthesize the information, and write what you learned, you’ll solidify the material in your mind and have better recall later. If you’re a more visual or verbal learner, draw a mind map summary or tell someone what you learned.

I never used to understand writing a summary as a young reader, but as an adult, it’s unbelievably useful for my memory. These are some great tips on reading faster and better

____________________

I wish there were more authors of color represented, but this look at children’s book and dessert pairings is fun. And makes me want to read picture books and eat snacks. 

____________________

The little-known writer claims he sent a pitch for his illustrated kids book, “A Heart is the Part That Makes Boys And Girls Smart,” to the president of Penguin Young Readers US, Jennifer Loja, in May 2013, according to the lawsuit.

Instead of publishing it, she passed the idea off to Clinton, who cashed in on his hard work, he claims in court papers.

“She Persisted,” published May 30, features at least three of the same quotes from inspiring historical women — including Helen Keller, Harriet Tubman and Nellie Bly — that appear in Kimberley’s book, along with similar images, the writer claims.

Clinton’s book centers on “13 American Women Who Changed the World” and is an “unauthorized reproduction of [Kimberly’s] work,” court papers state.

“The appearance of impropriety is striking,” he says in the lawsuit.

 

This is bananas. Bananas! 

Head to your next book club or board meeting in literary style! Buy any tote, get a notebook free.
VIEW COMMENTS