13 Bedrooms for Literature Lovers and More in Critical Linking

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13 bedrooms literature lovers would want to sleep in.

Literally, there’s nothing here but 13 pictures of drool-worthy bookshelf/bed combinations. Happy Sunday!

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According to Bookbrunch editor Neill Denny, these trends show the influence of a “Harry Potter cohort”, pointing out that a 12-year-old who read JK Rowling’s first novel in 1997 will become 31 in 2016. “A generation of women in their 20s and early 30s, who grew up reading Harry Potter, are now energising the book trade,” he wrote.

For Jo Henry at Nielsen Book, the female millennial’s book-buying power has shaped publishing over recent years, with strong sales for young adult books such as Divergence and the Hunger Games fuelled by young women over the age of 18 as well as by children.

“It is Generation Potter … Two years ago they were reading YA, now they’re coming on to grip lit – it’s the same cohort,” said Henry.

Boy is the term “grip lit” terrible to describe what book lovers know as “thrillers.” This is an interesting read on who is driving up book sales and trends. Wondering about the vast numbers of people in this generation (like myself) who aren’t Harry Potter readers.

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Literary society was not quite ready for Walt Whitman when his transformative volume, Leaves of Grass, came out in 1855. Whitman revised and expanded the poetry collection throughout his life and it’s now considered an essential part of the American literary canon. But when the collection was released, the contemporary reviews were more than skeptical. One 1856 review suggested that Whitman be sent to an insane asylum, and stated that its author would “not aid in extending the sale of this intensely vulgar, nay, absolutely beastly book, by telling our readers where it may be purchased” [PDF]. As late as the 1880s, a writer for The Atlanticdecried its “tedious and helpless prose.”

But Whitman did get a few friendly reviews. Some of them, in fact, came from his own pen. In hopes of bolstering sales, the writer reviewed his own book, anonymously publishing fawning endorsements of his own writing.

Sometimes the Common Man has to write a positive Song of Myself for himself. (Putting my English degree to good use here, okay?).

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BuzzFeed Books recently asked readers and followers to share their secret book confessions. Here are some of the (incredibly relatable) responses.

I know the first person here, and the rest of the responses are pretty great. What’s your book confession?

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