9 Banned Books From Across the Globe

Unfortunately, books are still being banned across the globe, and it’s up to us to know what they are so that we can push back against that ridiculousness. So for Banned Books Week, I give you a (partial) list of banned works of fiction by country (written since 2000). I, for one, will make it a point to read these.

Bangladesh

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All That Darkness (2004) by Taslima Nasrin

Banned for “containing passages that could incite communal passions.” (source)

 

China

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Beijing Doll (2000) by Chun Sue

Banned because of “its candid exploration of a young girl’s sexual awakening.” (source)

 

Eritrea

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My Father’s Daughter (2005) by Hannah Pool

Banned because of political content. (source)

 

Iran

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O Zahir (2005) by Paulo Coelho

No reason given. (source)

 

Lebanon

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The Da Vinci Code (2003) by Dan Brown

Deemed offensive to Christianity. (source)

 

Malaysia

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Fifty Shades of Grey (2011) by E. L. James

Contains “sadistic” material and is a “threat to morality.” (source)

 

Qatar

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Love Comes Later (2014) by Mohanalakshmi Rajakumar

No reason given. (source)

 

Turkey

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Henna and Mirror (2003) by Müslüm Yücel

Banned for containing “separatist propaganda.” (source)

 

United States

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The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian (2007) by Sherman Alexie

Banned in schools in the following cities: Stockton, Missouri; Richland, Washington; Newcastle, Wyoming; and Meridian, Idaho for the following reasons: “anti-family, cultural insensitivity, drugs/alcohol/smoking, gambling, offensive language, sex education, sexually explicit, unsuited for age group, violence, depictions of bullying” (source)

 

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