How Fan Art Affects My TBR Pile

I have realized something very important: I will never see a day without a To Be Read pile. Short of faking my own death*, there is no way to escape my well-meaning friends’ recommendations. And even if I switched on hermit-mode, there is always the internet.

Nothing ensures the growth of my TBR list like fan art. The moment an artist puts up something about a book they’ve read, I am automatically paying attention. Thing is, if fan art was simply about adding new books to my list it would almost be manageable— except, fan art not only makes me head to the nearest bookstore, it also makes me want to re-read old favourites. Thanks to all the obscenely talented artists who show up on my Tumblr dashboard, my “Take Charge of the TBR Pile” summer became an “Add More to TBR Pile, Ignore the Pile, and Re-Read Other Stuff” kind of summer.

The first book on my re-read list is, of course, Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Sáenz.

SOURCE: http://bit.ly/1K0KTu5

SOURCE: http://bit.ly/1K0KTu5

 

To be fair, Ari and Dante’s story has been slated into every summer of my life. It was only a question of when, until junknight’s fan art came up and I swear I heard someone yelling, “NOW! READ IT NOW, DAMMIT!”

Rioter Kat Howard’s post “Harry Potter and the Summer Re-Read” is, in part, to blame for the next book on my list. Mainly, it’s on chirravutever and her post-canon!Hermione.

SOURCE: http://bit.ly/1E4lcXx

SOURCE: http://bit.ly/1E4lcXx

 

The thought of Hermione and her itty daughter standing up to an unjust wizarding judicial system is the best, not just because we get to see her being a working mother, but because it answers the question of what happens after evil has been vanquished? Who cleans up the mess? Hermione does, of course! In order to remember the time Hermione’s social justice work was woefully ignored by the movies, I put Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire on my re-read list.

The third book on my list is The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater.

SOURCE: http://bit.ly/1IeofAn

SOURCE: http://bit.ly/1IeofAn

 

I’m all caught up with the series and I thought I could manage the wait for the final book, but may12324’s fan art asks some important questions: “Are you that strong, Yash? Just look at Blue. Look how wonderful her room is. Look at how well it reflects her personality. Don’t you miss her? Don’t you want to hang out with her? Don’t you?!” (I do.)

Next is Marie Lu’s The Young Elites.

SOURCE:  http://bit.ly/1IjtZ9U

SOURCE: http://bit.ly/1IjtZ9U

 

There is no fantasy sequel I am more excited for and aegisdea’s incredible, animated fan art has kept my fangirl mode on since she posted it last year. The first time I read The Young Elites, I mostly sped through all the non-Adelina centric parts, so this is my chance to slow down and contemplate the self-loathing that defines a character like Teren.

Kristin Cashore’s Fire is the last book on my re-read list.

SOURCE: http://bit.ly/1OKl70H

SOURCE: http://bit.ly/1OKl70H

 

There are so many amazing fan renditions of Lady Fire and she is certainly deserving of the attention. Good thing too, seeing as how it was walkingnorth-art’s fan art that convinced me to buy the Graceling Realm books in the first place. It’s possible that re-reading Fire will get me to started on the rest of Cashore’s books. But I’m certain that the euphoria of finishing two books on my TBR pile will fade fast …

SOURCE: http://bit.ly/1VWsoAb

SOURCE: http://bit.ly/1VWsoAb

 

… the lovely layaart has seen to adding at least two more series (that’s right, series) to my pile. I mean, of course, I’d want to read Shira Glassman’s Mangoverse books. This image? Combined with Glassman’s commentary? I am 100% here for these cuties.

SOURCE: http://bit.ly/1HkSlOM

SOURCE: http://bit.ly/1HkSlOM

 

And yes, I am also there for Mr. Tousled Hair from Lori M. Lee’s Gates of Thread and Stone.

And that’s the thing about art (fannish or not)— it always makes me want to know more about the people illustrated: about their lives, their personalities, their families, their childhood rooms. It makes me want their stories. It’s probably what book covers are trying to do— though how they hope to do that when they silhouette characters (often POCs) or obscure faces (often female) is beyond me— but it’s artists like the ones here who make me pay attention. I owe them an awful lot. And, I suspect, so do publishers.

*or moving to a place without a library

A gift from us to you! Get free mismatched library socks with any purchase in the Book Riot Store while supplies last. Treat yourself (and your favorite elf). br_mismatched_rc
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