The Week’s Most Popular Posts: April 13 – 17, 2015

This post originally appeared on Panels, which is now Book Riot Comics

Here’s what you were reading this week on Panels:

So for anyone who has a non-compliant tattoo, I hope you’ll take the time to tell us a little bit about yourself; and if you know someone else who does, pass them the link, won’t you?

from Non-Compliant: A Survey by Jenn Northington

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Fortunately, there are no “cool girls” at Marvel Comics, just awesome ladies: women who are elevated, not hamstrung, by their relationships with other women. Virtually every female-led title at Marvel in the last few years has featured varied female friendships and relationships.

from No “Cool Girls” Allowed: Female Friendship at Marvel by Jon Erik Christianson

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If you’ve not watched Twin Peaks (heck, maybe even if you have), you might be wondering what it is about the show that created such a cult following. For me, I think it was the strange blend of elements, all filtered through the unique lens of David Lynch, that really made the show stand out in 1990. At first glance, it’s a slab of pure Americana: a small town in the pacific northwest: diners, a lumber mill, high school cheerleaders and jocks in letter jackets… all suddenly punctured by the discovery of a dead girl, wrapped in plastic. And out of that punctured surface escapes a much darker world. Murder. Drugs. Prostitution. And beneath that? Something even more sinister. Something beyond our understanding. Something utterly weird.

Of course, given my reaction above, I’m sure you can imagine my despair after reading the news that negotiations had stalled and Lynch had apparently left the project.

At this point, it seems as though there’s still a chance that Lynch and Showtime will come to an agreement, but while we wait, I’ve taken it upon myself to put together a list of comics that feature some of those elements that made Twin Peaks such an influential beacon on the TV landscape.

from 8 Comics for Despondent Twin Peaks Fans by Dave Accampo

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As a comic series, Daredevil is known for not being … great at how the writers portray women. They often suffer from women-in-refrigerators-syndrome, or they are just there for Matt to learn more about himself. So with the show, I was hoping for so much more than what we got. There are excellent moments for our female heroines, to be sure: Karen shooting Wesley at point blank range, Claire not taking any of Matt’s shit, Vanessa being incredible in general, and so on. That doesn’t change the fact that this show, in thirteen episodes, manages to not pass the Bechdel Test more than a handful of times (and they are all Karen Page talking to Mrs. Cardenas). That combined with Foggy’s constant assertion that Matt gets all “hot women” as if that’s the most important thing a girl can be (it comes up at several separate times over the course of the series) and throw away lines about girly mags and looking up a girly’s skirt from the grizzled old men (Ben Urich and Stick, respectfully, because old men are just inherently sexist dontchaknow), I thought we should run down how the most prominent women are treated in this series.

from The Women of Daredevil by Preeti Chhibber

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When it comes to cons in the U.S there are the obvious giants—San Diego and New York City. Unarguably these two feel like the Mecca and the capital of geekdom: major announcements about movies and TV, high concentration of star power, etc. Third on the podium in terms of attendance is Emerald City Comicon in Seattle.  And as the attendance of these super-powered conventions grows every year, con culture is on the rise everywhere. From Denver to Chicago to Phoenix a lot of them are called COMIC cons.  But are they still truly about comics?

from ECCC: Putting Comic Back Into Comic-Con by Hélène

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