Crossing the Streams: Superman and the Quik Bunny

This post originally appeared on Panels, which is now Book Riot Comics

Here at Crossing the Streams, we check out those moments when characters who don’t normally interact suddenly do.

Superman really needs no introduction. He’s been the face of superheroes for generations of folks all over the world. His chest symbol is one of the most recognized images anywhere. The Man of Steel is known to be a defender of the innocent and to strive for truth and justice. Through the years, he’s met presidents, top notch athletes, and the common man. The Quik Bunny, meanwhile, is the spokesman for the Nesquik brand chocolate milk powders and syrups. There wasn’t a whole lot of overlap between the two until 1987 when Superman Meets the Quik Bunny was published.

Superman Meets the Quik Bunny (1987) Cover

Superman Meets the Quik Bunny (1987) cover by Carmine Infantino and Dick Giordano

This was a one-off promotional comic intended to sell Nesquik (then simply called Quik or Nestle Quik in the United States) to children. Over the years, DC and Marvel have done these types of corporate tie-ins on a number of occasions though this one is certainly one of a kind.

The story starts off simply. Four ethnically diverse pre-teens named Miguel, Maureen, Ronnie, and Patty have just built a sweet treehouse in the suburbs of Metropolis. They spend a lot of their time hanging out with the Quik Bunny, an anthropomorphic rabbit whose only source of nutrients comes from delicious, velvety Nestle Quik. So, the four decide to call their new treehouse the Quik Qlub, a name that makes my skin crawl a bit to see the word “club” butchered so savagely.

Superman Meets the Quik Bunny (1987) by Mike Carlin, Carmine Infantino, and Dick Giordano

Superman Meets the Quik Bunny (1987) by Mike Carlin, Carmine Infantino, and Dick Giordano

As the story progressed, it was shown that the Quik Qlub had a seemingly endless supply of goods and plenty of space to store everything. It had a giant television, helicopter blades for travel, computers, a jet engine, fuel for that jet engine, a rope ladder, and the greatest thing of all: unlimited amounts of Quik. Oh, and friendship. It also had friendship. But seriously, mostly Quik.

Anyway, the four friends and their weird bunny friend soon discovered that the weather in Metropolis was acting strangely and they figured that Superman could use some help in figuring out the problem. Instead of trying to track down Booster Gold, Gangbuster, Black Lightning, or any of the other heroes based in Metropolis, the kids decided to help out Superman directly. Through computer usage and code cracking, the Quik Qlub figured out that the Weather Wizard, an old foe of the Flash, was the one making trouble for Metropolis. Superman thanked them for their help but kindly hinted that they should butt out. Bunnies aren’t well known to pick up humans’ social cues so the group decided to keep on helping their hero.

Superman Meets the Quik Bunny (1987) by Mike Carlin, Carmine Infantino, and Dick Giordano

Superman Meets the Quik Bunny (1987) by Mike Carlin, Carmine Infantino, and Dick Giordano

It’s never established what the Weather Wizard is really after. He just seems to be creating a nuisance for the communities he shows up in. Maybe he’s after some diamonds or something? You know what. Sure. Let’s go with that. He was after diamonds, I guess.

Having figured out Weather Wizard’s lame clue that revealed he was going to Washington, D.C. next, the Quik Qlub headed to the nation’s capital. There, Superman kept the Washington Monument from toppling over in a tornado. While Superman was preoccupied, the Quik Bunny kept the Weather Wizard busy by going into a Nestle Quik-based sugar buzz and rapidly fidgeting.

Superman Meets the Quik Bunny (1987) by Mike Carlin, Carmine Infantino, and Dick Giordano

Superman Meets the Quik Bunny (1987) by Mike Carlin, Carmine Infantino, and Dick Giordano

Now, the Weather Wizard routinely goes up against the Flash, who at various points in his career could run faster than the speed of light if need be. However, a rabbit jumping around near him was too much for the rogue in this story. It wasn’t the Wizard’s finest hour.

After this minor tussle, the Weather Wizard again escaped. This time, he made it clear he was going to Egypt. After the Quik Qlub jetted halfway around the world, that got word that their prey was hiding out in one of Egypt’s ancient pyramids. Instead of using super speed and x-ray vision to grab the Wizard out of the pyramid without a moment’s hesitation, Superman instead choose to destroy one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World in a display of shocking cultural insensitivity and historical blindness.

Superman Meets the Quik Bunny (1987) by Mike Carlin, Carmine Infantino, and Dick Giordano

Superman Meets the Quik Bunny (1987) by Mike Carlin, Carmine Infantino, and Dick Giordano

Sure, the scene ended with Superman repairing the pyramid, but his actions defiled one of the most awe-inspiring creations on the planet. It was a poor choice especially for such a small time crook as the Weather Wizard who once again escaped.

Another jaunt across the world and the Weather Wizard was finally captured in China by the teamwork of the Quik Qlub, the Quik Bunny, and Superman. To celebrate their victory, Superman finally agreed to personally shill for the Nestle Food Corporation by drinking some Quik.

Superman Meets the Quik Bunny (1987) by Mike Carlin, Carmine Infantino, and Dick Giordano

Superman Meets the Quik Bunny (1987) by Mike Carlin, Carmine Infantino, and Dick Giordano

Poor Maureen getting edged out of the final panel like that. Tough break, kid.

Superman and the Quik Bunny would never meet again. Each went back to his respective place in the pop culture landscape: Superman to star in more multi-million dollar movies and television shows and the Quik Bunny to try to get kids to drink more chocolate sugar. The Man of Steel would never again be shown drinking Quik. I can’t help but wonder if it’s because he has always secretly been an Ovaltine man. After all, he and his fellow Justice Leaguers worked with Ovaltine first.

Ad for Ovaltine / Justice League t-shirt

Ad for Ovaltine / Justice League t-shirt

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