Critical Linking

Critical Linking: August 24, 2013

Our daily round-up of bookish links. Tastes great with coffee.

For decades, the USSR heavily promoted folk tales as a safe form of “national” culture, recruiting prominent artists to illustrate editions of stories taken from the many ethnic groups that lived in the USSR. These books were not only promoted within the USSR but were also at times translated into English, French, German and other languages- all in the name of promoting Soviet culture, just as today the US state department uses the same (or similar) material to promote cross-cultural collaboration.

Folktales are fantastic, but I have never understood why people think they are safe.

___________________

“These are strange conundrums that no generation has ever faced before, and it’s a fascinating jumping off point for what I hope will be a very interesting book about modern courtship.”

As long as it is as smart as it sounds and doesn’t turn into Tom Haverford’s Guide to Lovin’ the Ladies, I’ll be preordering a copy.

___________________

One of the biggest misconceptions is that “science fiction publishing is run by men,” says Anne Sowards with Ace and Roc. In fact, despite the ongoing debates over gender in science fiction, a ton of editors and other publishing professionals are women. And there’s also a pervasive belief that the door is closed to women authors in science fiction as opposed to urban fantasy, which a few editors said just isn’t true.

They can say it’s not true, but did they offer any proof?

___________________

I wanted to hate this book. After all, this was a book for children, and I don’t do children’s books.

There is so much wrong with this.

___________________

Sign up for our newsletter to have the best of Book Riot delivered straight to your inbox every two weeks. No spam. We promise.

To keep up with Book Riot on a daily basis, follow us on Twitter, like us on Facebook, and subscribe to the Book Riot podcast in iTunes or via RSS. So much bookish goodness–all day, every day.