Critical Linking

Critical Linking for August 22, 2013

Our daily round-up of bookish links. Tastes great with coffee.

 

I am sure you are all aware of Wikipedia, and probably use it on a regular basis, but have you ever considered how big this resource actually is? At the moment there are around 3,887,569 articles, this is equivalent to 1,638.6 volumes of the Encyclopædia Britannica. So what if you were to print this and make it in to a physical product?

This is exactly what student Rob Matthews has done, well 0.01% of it anyway.

For a second, I thought I was looking at a galley of the new George RR Martin book…

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The Windhoek Public Library closed its three study rooms two weeks ago because some users were indulging in sexual activities as well as watching pornography while in the rooms.

The other option would be to open more rooms.

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The novel has always liked length, of course. From Samuel Richardson’s Pamela onwards, through the 18th and 19th centuries until the strike of modernism in the early 20th, when the telling of stories became a more tenuous, uncertain business, writers have tended towards the fat doorstopper rather than the slim volume. So big books are hitting the bookshelves again; what’s new?

It seems like we get one of these “big books are back” articles every couple of years, but I don’t think big books went anywhere.

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Esther Earl, an avid reader and star of quirky YouTube videos, died at age 16 in 2010, four years after she was diagnosed with thyroid cancer. Two years later, John Green dedicated his teen novel, The Fault in Our Stars, to Esther. The best seller is narrated by Hazel, a quirky 16-year-old girl with thyroid cancer.

Now Esther is about to become an author.

Definitely not tearing up. Not at all.

 

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