Critical Linking

Critical Linking: August 20th, 2013

Our daily round-up of bookish links. Tastes great with coffee.

 

“They’re the only place that people can go and get a free computer and free Internet, for the most part, in America,” Vermont librarian Jessamyn West explains. “And when you still have a country where 19 percent of Americans don’t have any Internet at home, that paints a serious picture.”

Brings up an interesting question: what would you pay, out of pocket, to keep your local library open and reasonably well-funded? What is your library worth to you?

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“Last month we started a book pricing war with Amazon,” said Patrick Byrne, Overstock.com chairman and CEO in the statement. “We’re hoping to continue that battle, in a way that lessens any harm to the mom-and-pop booksellers we consider our comrades in arms.”

The enemy of my enemy often is still the enemy.

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As the Center for the Education of Women at the University of Michigan planned a celebration of its 50th anniversary next year, they offered an invitation to a Pulitzer-Prize-winning author. But despite her eagerness to attend, Alice Walker won’t be speaking at the event: the Center later rescinded the invitation, and Walker says the issue is over her past criticism of Israel.

You take a stand and you take your lumps sometimes.

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The Mako Mori test is passed if the movie has: a) at least one female character; b) who gets her own narrative arc; c) that is not about supporting a man’s story. I think this is about as indicative of “feminism” (that is, minimally indicative, a pretty low bar) as the Bechdel test. It is a pretty basic test for the representation of women, as is the Bechdel test. It does not make a movie automatically feminist. 

I think we can pretty much agree that feminism and gender politics aren’t really conducive to two- or three-factor “tests” like this. These sorts of things should be the start, not the end, of discussion.

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