Critical Linking

Critical Linking: August 16, 2013

Our daily round-up of bookish links. Tastes great with coffee.

 

Harlequin is expanding its publishing programs with the launch of new digital first initiatives. The Harlequin, Harlequin Teen, Harlequin Mira, and Harlequin HQN imprints will all publish e-book originals in the coming months.

Get it, Harlequin!

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Clarkson, an avowed Austen fan who has also purchased a first edition of the author’s novel “Persuasion,” set off a battle with her purchase at auction of Austen’s gold and turquoise ring. The British government stepped in, declaring the object a national treasure and placing a temporary export ban on the item on Aug. 1, meaning it can’t leave the country.

And now an anonymous donor has given $154,000 to a campaign by the Jane Austen’s House Museum to buy Austen’s ring.

Sooo when will all the British museums be returning national treasures to their countries of origin? Bueller? 

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L. Frank Baum’s “The Wizard of Oz” is set to be the inspiration for a new CBS show titled “Dorothy,” which is described as “a medical soap based in New York City inspired by the characters and themes from The Wizard of Oz,” according to Deadline.

Dorothy-cum-Grey’s-Anatomy? Do we really need another medical drama?

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In United States, 58% of students favour digital textbooks over printed ones. Europe prefers print textbooks. In United Kingdom, 59% of surveyed students favoured the classic textbook, 70% in the Netherlands and Denmark. Out of those UK students who voted for digital textbooks, 62.5% said they are easier to carry.

If I could do college over, I’d do all digital textbooks, all the time. Save the back.

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