Critical Linking

Critical Linking: January 8th, 2012

Our daily round-up of bookish links. Tastes great with coffee.

Each story is written by a different author, bringing together some of the most exciting names in children’s fiction, from commercial blockbusters to literary award-winners. These authors will each bring their own interpretation and reimagining of their chosen Doctor to create a unique Doctor Who adventure in their own inimitable style.

As fan fiction projects go, this one’s pretty cool.

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I am instead quite cheerful about the ongoing destruction of pre-digital patterns of life, because I think something better will come from it, as happened previously, in my view, with print, the telegraph, and the telephone. If I’m wrong, of course, then my arguments are helping usher in a new Dark Ages, a Bosch nightmare populated by Advice Animals with a soundtrack of Gangnam Style on endless loop, but so far, I’m liking my chances.

I like them too.

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I turned to the Internets and did an impromptu survey: What determines the books you read? Also, what goes into your decision to buy a book? Here are the answers, many covering both questions:

There are 25 answers, which means there are no answers. (side note: when did intentional subject/verb disagreements signify modernity on the internets?)

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If the pre-1978 law were still in effect, we could have seen 85% of the works created in 1984 enter the public domain on January 1, 2013. Imagine what that would mean to our archives, our libraries, our schools and our culture. Such works could be digitized, preserved, and made available for education, for research, for future creators. Instead, they will remain under copyright for decades to come, perhaps even into the next century.

There are many dumb, incomprehensible laws here in the US, but copyright law wields the scepter of dumb.