Critical Linking

Critical Linking: The Most Read Stories, November 5 – 10, 2012

Our daily round-up of bookish links. Tastes great with coffee.

Here are the most read stories from the last week in Critical Linking…

In the popular imagination, writers and professors are liberals, hedonists, bohemians. Nothing could be further from the truth. They are, in fact, profoundly, deeply, organically conservative.

This is sort of true. Liberal about things you would call “political,” but when it comes to anything about books,wildy, wildly conservative.

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So this is how a man acquires 10,000-odd books, more than he could ever display or read. It’s a combination of maniacal persistence and utter nostalgic whimsy. You have to be willing to search high and low for a potential beauty, but most of the time you’ll take a Book Club hardcover of a book you don’t like if it reminds you of something from your past.

This is pretty much what I want to do all the time.

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Writers’ incomes have fallen significantly over the past decade, down from an average of $23,000 to just $11,000 by 2011, and so prizes can be a very important source of income for them.

DOWN from 23k. The good ‘ol days kinda sucked.

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In fact, she admitted to having already thought through the entire story. “I planned out where it would go for a couple more books,” she said. “So, I knew exactly what would happen,” of the storyline that involves Jake, played by Taylor Lautner in the films, and Renesmee, played by Mackenzie Foy, following the end of Breaking Dawn.

I am sure there are a lot of people who would be super-excited for this.

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Why is it that in YA literature — a genre generated entirely to describe the transition to adulthood — there is so much fear and ambivalence surrounding manhood?

Right, as opposed to adult literature, in which manhood is knowable and not at all problematic.

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I do not want to read, to write more. I have dedicated my life to the novel: I studied, I taught, I wrote and I read. With the exclusion of almost everything else. Enough is enough!

Isn’t reading more supposed to be one of the perks of retirement?