Features

Libraries of the Rich and Famous: Part Two

Here we are again… you didn’t think I’d leave you hanging with only one installment of fabulous libraries did you? What if we pooled together money and created a house where there were no rooms what-so-ever beside libraries? All different, all wonderful, all ours? Divine. Let’s get going on that, shall we? In the meantime, grab a napkin because you’re about to be drooling over these lovelies…

Thanks to a reader from last week pointing out Neil Gaiman’s library to me. HELLO, this man reads. Think he’s read all of these, or might some of these be his to-be-read shelves?!?

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Sting’s library at the top of his staircase in London is beautiful. Very law school-philosophy vibe going on here… I dig it. Do you?

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Um, yes please! This is the library of designers Mark Badgley and James Mischka’s in their weekend house. I’ll take the weekend house and the library. The black painted wood adds a modern twist to this library, and I enjoy that they combined an eating area with their books. In fact, I think this would inspire me to have a reading dinner party. Wine, books, friends, and a game guessing passages from books? I’m there. 

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Here is Julia Child’s personal library from when she lived in Cambridge, Massachusetts. This cozy, warm, neutral-toned library makes me want to curl up next to that fireplace and get lost in a book — or possibly a conversation with Julia and Paul about the books they own. Can you imagine the books that must be in that library? Paul was known as a very smart, well read man… I’m sure they have some treasures in there. If the walls could speak. 

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This by far is my favorite library we’ve featured, and probably my favorite personal library that I’ve ever seen. It belongs to Professor Richard A. Macksey. Macksey is an author in his own right along with being a well-known, beloved professor at Johns Hopkins University, and co-founder of the university’s Humanities Center. He is the owner of one of the largest personal libraries in the state of Maryland, with over 70,000 ($4 million worth) books and manuscripts along with art work. Macksey’s course on Proust is famous among underground students at Johns Hopkins, and he is known to hold graduate level courses in his famous library.