Our Favorite Comments: February 6th – 12th, 2012

We love our readers, and we love what they say just as much. Here are a few gems from last week.

Hold: Stephen King. Arguably the most popular and read living writer. He’s written some classic books from “The Shining” to “Pet Semetery”. He’s broken away from the horror genre and returned to it. He’s been dismissed by some readers and praised by others. Will King be discovered by new readers? He has so much out there to read its hard not to imagine so. Is King truly going to be in league with his idols like Lovecraft and Poe? Or is his work too present day to really be discovered well beyond his time?

By CardinalIron on Picking Literary Stocks

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Recently I was struggling with coming up with a good reading order for someone new to Mitchell. My first Mitchell book was Cloud Atlas and I absolutely loved it, but I also came to the conclusion that Black Swan Green was a good starting point.  I’d probably stick Ghostwritten in between it and Cloud Atlas,  and I think Thousand Autumns at the end makes sense.  Just not sure where to put my favorite, number9dream.

And in case any Mitchell fans missed it, I really enjoyed this book of Critical Essays on Mitchell’s work:http://www.gylphi.co.uk/mitche… A few chapters were dense, but they really helped me gain a greater understanding of Mitchell’s stuff and introduced me to some other great stuff (If on a Winter’s Night a Traveler, Never Let me Go)

By Kyle Behymer on Reading Pathways: David Mitchell

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“It’s interesting, because you find a lot of Big 6 haters among writing circles because of their less than friendly policies towards authors on a variety of topics; then you go to book lover circles and find a lot of Amazon-haters because of their less than friendly policies towards brick and mortar/readers who don’t want a monopoly. This is not an either/or situation – it’s a both and neither situation. Both Amazon and Big 6 do things well. Neither do things perfectly. Both Amazon and Big 6 are concerned principally with profit. Neither are putting books and readers first. I hope that we continue to see innovation outside of these companies so that our reading futures are guided more by bookishly passionate disrupters and less by competition at all costs megacorps. Until then, I’m trying to divide my business equally between all players so that no one area can dictate the market- of course, I’m sure that all of these companies care deeply about where I put my couple hundred dollars of book buying power every year ;)”

By thefranklynn on The Love That Dare Not Speak Its Name: An Editor’s Dilemma

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“I agree that they are two separate art forms and should be judged that way. After listening to a friend complain that Peter Jackson didn’t include the “Green Man” in his movie, I decided that I didn’t want to be that person. Of course they can’t include everything in the movie and if it doesn’t move the story forward it can be cut for time and should be. I love “Silence of the Lambs”, both movie and book. They will both give you chills and the stuff that is left out is not germane to the plot.  That being said, I was so excited to see “Where the Wild Things Are”, I have given a copy of that book to so many children. I loved it as a child and loved reading it to my children. Hated the movie, it was so violent, and awful, I felt like crying about half-way through. To make it worse I had taken my younger sister to see it for her birthday. She’s five years younger and I used to read it to her. Truly horrific.  A good movie will make you want to read the book, or re-read it, and a great book will make you want to see what they will make of it in a movie. If only to complain about it.”

By Queen Tisha on Oscar Watch: Don’t Judge a Book…

 

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